Archive for kaywoodie.myfreeforum.org A place to discuss collecting kaywoodie pipes and related lines
 


       kaywoodie.myfreeforum.org Forum Index -> Kaywoodie Talk
pipesbywhitney

Kaywoodie Article from "OLD BRIAR"

Here's the article from my book "OLD BRIAR" on Kaywoodie pipes - Dave Whitney:


The All-Time American Beauty

In the preceding chapters, I have covered some of the more common pipes that you will find on eBay and from other estate pipe outlets. There is no way I could cover all of the more than 7,000 brands of pipes that have been identified by others, but there is one American brand that has made such an impact on the pipe world that I cannot go on to other subjects without giving it at least a broad brush.

Kaywoodie is undoubtedly the All-Time American Beauty of pipes. Or, at the very least, the most world-renowned of all pipes produced in the United States since briar became a smoke-shop word. It was the favorite of President Gerald Ford when he was in the White House. Ford was an ardent pipe smoker and prided himself on the fact that he was smoking an “American Made” pipe while puffing away on his Kaywoodies.

The most prominent of today’s Kaywoodie experts is Bill Feuerbach of S.M. Frank & Co. (www.smfrankcoinc.com), which today makes Kaywoodie pipes as well as the Yello-Bole and Medico brands. Feuerbach is a wealth of Kaywoodie information and can be contacted through the company’s web pages. I’ve found him quick to respond to questions from people interested in old Kaywoodie briars. He has written some informative “Ask Mr. Kaywoodie” columns for the Pipe Collector newsletter (www.naspc.org).

A good treatise on Kaywoodie model numbers and shapes can be found in Rare Smoke by Richard Carleton Hacker (1999, Autumngold Publishing, Beverly Hills, CA).

Robert W. Stokes, Ph.D., is a Kansas professor who wrote the Collector’s Guide to Kaywoodie Pipes: A Partial Chronology of Kaywoodie Grades, Shapes and Prices (1936 - 1969).

The Collector’s Guide can be found online at (www.chriskeene.com/kwg-toc). Stoke’s monograph provides a wealth of information on the most popular all-time series of Kaywoodies.

For the sake of brevity in trying to make our dating of Kaywoodie’s easier, Bruce Fifield in Jacksonville, FL, one of the best Kaywoodie restorers I have worked with, prepared from many different sources the following compilation of Kaywoodie facts.

Kaywoodie Facts

1919 – Kaywoodie pipe line first offered by KBB. The origin of the name is from K      in Kaufman and wood as in briar.

1919 – The first Kaywoodie pipes came with a hand-cut rubber push-bit stem fitted with an aluminum in-bore tube. The device was to “assure a clean, cool smoke.” Other KKB pipes, such as Ambassador, Heatherby and Melrose also had the in-bore tube.

1919 – The first Kaywoodies are stamped Kaywoodie, in an arch, over a cloverleaf outline with the initials KB&B (with the ampersand) inside the outline.

1919 – The shape number, when present, is four-digits beginning with the numbers 42. This first two numbers (42) were assigned to Kaywoodies to differentiate them from other KB&B brands, which had their own prefix numbers. The second 2 numbers, occasionally followed by a letter, referred to the shape.

1924 – The Kaywoodie in-bore tube is replaced by a “Drinkless” filter/condenser that is screwed into the end of a push-tenon stem.

1924 – The first Drinkless pipes (1924 – 1929) have two-digit shape numbers. The shanks are stamped KBB (without the ampersand) inside a shamrock outline and Drinkless over Kaywoodie on the left side of the shank. They are always stamped “Aged Bruyere” on the other side of the shank.

1929 – The now-famous Synchro-stem’s tenon system is introduced. The “Synchro-stem” patent was issued in 1931. The early synchro-stem pipes (1928 – 1931) are stamped “Synchro-stem Pat. Applied For.” The pipes are also stamped with the shamrock outline containing the letters KBB without the ampersand and “Drinkless” or “Relief Grain” over Kaywoodie.

1929 – With the advent of the “Synchro-stem,” Kaywoodies were again stamped with four (4) digit model numbers. This practice continued until some time between 1938 and 1941. Many early “Synchro-stems” are also stamped “Aged Bruyere,” “Algerian Bruyere,” “Italian Briar,” “Suntan” or “Rock Ambera.”

Late ’20s – Four-digit, push-tenon versions of Kaywoodie pipes were also available between the late ’20s and mid ’30s. By the mid-’30s all Kaywoodies came with the screw-mounted “Drinkless” attachment.  

1930 – The KBB corporate office is moved to the Empire State Bldg., 5th Avenue, New York

1932 – The Kaywoodie manufacturing operations are moved from the KBB plant in Union City, NJ to 6400 Broadway, West New York, NJ.

1933 – Pipes produced in the new plant between 1933 and mid-1935 are stamped “Super Grain,” “Drinkless,” or “Thorn” over Kaywoodie with a four-digit shape number. They are usually also stamped “Aged Bruyere” or “Algerian Bruyere” but are never stamped “Imported Briar.”

_____________________________________________________________________

Super Grains:

1931: Super Grains first appeared in late 1931 or early 1932.  They were produced from specially procured “Grecian Briar” and are the only pipes Kaywoodie ever produced with the white shamrock in the shank and no stem logo.

1931 – 1932: The shank stamp is Kaywoodie over Super Grain in slanted, all-capital block letters. The lettering in Super Grain is slightly smaller than that in Kaywoodie. The back of the shank has “Aged Bruyere” and a four-digit shape number. On these early Super Grains, you will also see “Synchro-stem, “Pat. Applied For” on the bottom of the shank.

1932 - 1935: The shank stamp is changed to a larger script Super Grain over slanted all-caps Kaywoodie. The back of the shank has “Grecian Briar” along with the four-digit shape number.

1934: Super Grain pipes introduced “en masse” as Kaywoodie’s Top Of The Line.

1936: Super Grains produced after early-to-mid 1936 are stamped “Imported Briar” on the back of the shank.

1938: Around this time, possibly as early as 1937, the cloverleaf was moved from the shank to the stem on the Super Grains.
_____________________________________________________________________

1936 – The KBB corporate office is moved to the Rockefeller Center, 630 5th Avenue, New York City. They remained at this location until 1952 when KBB was bought by a company that was not a pipe maker. The name of this interim company is not known.

1936 – Kaywoodie Company formed as a subsidiary of KBB. Reiss-Premier Pipe Co. also a part of the Kaywoodie organization. Pipes made by Reiss-Premier had the pipe’s name stamped inside an elongated diamond on the shank of the pipe.

1938 - The Flame Grain was introduced as the new Top Of The Line. The Flame Grain was the first pipe to have the black cloverleaf in the white circle. The Flame Grains of 1938 did not have 4-digit numbers. Meerschaum Lined Flame Grains were only made from the early 1940’s until 1971.

Late ’30s or Early ’40s - The four-hole drinkless fitment is changed to a shorter shaft and a smaller diameter ball.

1938 – Kaywoodie of London established. Company is jointly owned with Comoy’s of London.

1941 – Kaywoodie embarks on a program of domestically grown briar wood called Mission Briar or manzanita. The project was abandoned after World War II.

Early 1950s - The drinkless fitment is changed to a three-hole pattern. The first three-hole fitments (early ’50s) had just a plain round shaft between the threads and the shoulder of the stem.

Mid 1950s – A small raised ring was added to the fitment about 1/16 of an inch out from the shoulder so that an O-ring could be added if the pipe leaked at the shank-stem joint. This ring was fairly thin and came to a point/ridge on the outside diameter. About 1960, the ring was made a little wider and was more rounded at the outside diameter.  

1955 – Kaywoodie, KBB, Riess-Premier and The New England Briar Pipe Co. are purchased by S. M. Frank & Co. Kaywoodie and Yello-Bole are set up as separate companies (divisions of the parent organization). Kaywoodie Co. is re-named Kaywoodie Pipes Inc.

1956 – Fine Line Kaywoodies were only made in 1956 and then off and on from 1962 to 1976.

1960 – S. M. Frank starts a new company called Heritage pipes. The Heritage pipes were an upscale line of push-bit pipes meant to compliment the Kaywoodie line. Heritage produced some fine pipes, but the company was dissolved in 1971.  

Early ’60s – Kaywoodie corporate offices moved to 18 East 54th St., New York, N.Y.

1968 – Kaywoodie sales office moved to 745 5th Avenue, New York, N.Y.    


Kaywoodie Synchro-Stem Models:

Drinkless………………………………………………………1929
Straight Grain………………………………………………….1929
Thorn…………………………………………………………..1929
Relief Grain……………………………………………………1929
Super Grain……………………………………………………Late 1931 – Early 1932
Carburetor……………………………………………………..1936 (maybe earlier)
Flame Grain……………………………………………………1937
Gale…………………………………………………………….1937
Handmade Drinkless Kaywoodie – standard shape……………WWII    
Handmade Super Grain Kaywoodie – standard shape…………WWII
Centennial………………………………………………………1947
Ninety-Fiver…………………………………………………….1947
Handmade or Handmade Super Grain – oversize………………1947
____________________________________________________________________



I have restored and owned my share of Kaywoodies. My preference is an old World War II hand-carved, one-quarter bent bulldog with a push stem and no metal innards. I love that old pipe and have to remind myself to give it a rest once I start smoking it. A better piece of briar would be difficult to come by!

About the time I wrapped up the first draft of this section of this book, I spotted a nice, plain-vanilla Kaywoodie Majestic quarter-bent pipe a few minutes from auction’s end on eBay at a ridiculously low price – less than $10 – and no bids. I snatched it up with a quick, last-minute bid.

It needed restoration when it came in, so I cleaned it up and gave it a little polish before firing it. It smoked delightfully. The Majestic is a current-production Kaywoodie and the second “Gold Series” (www.smfrankcoinc.com) pipe I have owned from Kaywoodie’s current production. I also have owned one of Kaywoodies new Hand Made pipes – actually the No. 7 one Kaywoodie made in 1998, the first year of offering the freehand Hand Mades.

Quality is a bit different from the old Kaywoodies. All of the present-day ones, including the high-end Hand Made, have had either sand pits or fills in the finish. The Hand Made had a couple of obvious sand pits.

The Gold Series pipes have both had fills, small ones to be sure, but fills that one could see through the finish on the pipes.

The first Gold Series pipe I ran across was an Elite bent egg-shaped. Like the Majestic it too turned out to be a good smoker, although both took some modification before they felt and smoked right to me. The major part of the modification was removing the somewhat artificial-looking finish that had been applied to the pipes at the factory.

I found that just sanding them down to the wood, giving it more ability to breathe, gave the pipes a better “feel” and therefore, for me, a more comfortable and pleasant smoke. The small fills in both of the Gold Series pipes I have had – I sold the egg simply because it is not a style that I actually prefer – blended in well with the natural burl finish on both pipes and, as they were smoked and began to take on their own patina, the fills began to fade away.

I might sound as if I am going back on my opinion that old briar is the best, but that is not the case. The case here seems to be that the modern Kaywoodie has apparently found a curing process for its briar that is turning out good mid-range ($45-$60 – circa 2009) pipes, and they are beginning to show up on eBay at bargain prices. You might want to take a look at them.
Wildcat

Great stuff Dave! Thank you!
lifeon2

Thanks for sharing that Dave I was wondering if you would mind if I put a link to purchase your book in the resto section?
Wildcat

admin wrote:
Thanks for sharing that Dave I was wondering if you would mind if I put a link to purchase your book in the resto section?
Very Happy  Exclamation
pipesbywhitney

Wildcat wrote:
admin wrote:
Thanks for sharing that Dave I was wondering if you would mind if I put a link to purchase your book in the resto section?
Very Happy  Exclamation


Go ahead ... Amazon.Kindle is the best bet, or just PM me and I'll sell it direct - $12 on CD in .pdf format ... formatted for 8x10 pring out ... Dave
bosun

Thanks Dave.  And the Cd has some more great info!
Wildcat

bosun wrote:
Thanks Dave.  And the Cd has some more great info!
More than on the Kindle version? I love WhitneybyKindle!!
pipesbywhitney

Wildcat wrote:
bosun wrote:
Thanks Dave.  And the Cd has some more great info!
More than on the Kindle version? I love WhitneybyKindle!!


They should be the same - I think I just updated both not long ago ... Dave
nsfisher

That's some good info mate, much appreciated
riff raff

[/quote]1929 – With the advent of the “Synchro-stem,” Kaywoodies were again stamped with four (4) digit model numbers. This practice continued until some time between 1938 and 1941. Many early “Synchro-stems” are also stamped “Aged Bruyere,” “Algerian Bruyere,” “Italian Briar,” “Suntan” or “Rock Ambera.” [quote]

Dave:
I just grabbed an 8783B Drinkless pipe with "Aged Bruyere".   Any idea what year of manufacture this might be? (1931-1932?)

More pictures here:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Drinkless...;rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557



[img]http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NTAwWDUwMA==/z/P60AAOSwy4hUS--J/$_12.JPG?rt=nc[/img]
[img]http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NTAwWDUzNw==/z/j9YAAOSwr81US--L/$_12.JPG?rt=nc[/img]
pipesbywhitney

riff raff wrote:
1929 – With the advent of the “Synchro-stem,” Kaywoodies were again stamped with four (4) digit model numbers. This practice continued until some time between 1938 and 1941. Many early “Synchro-stems” are also stamped “Aged Bruyere,” “Algerian Bruyere,” “Italian Briar,” “Suntan” or “Rock Ambera.”
Quote:


Dave:
I just grabbed an 8783B Drinkless pipe with "Aged Bruyere".   Any idea what year of manufacture this might be? (1931-1932?)

More pictures here:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Drinkless...;rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557



[img]http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NTAwWDUwMA==/z/P60AAOSwy4hUS--J/$_12.JPG?rt=nc[/img]
[img]http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NTAwWDUzNw==/z/j9YAAOSwr81US--L/$_12.JPG?rt=nc[/img]


That's a beautiful old Kaywoodie ... I had been watching it ... I can't definitely pin it down anymore than probably the early 1930s, but it is surely a winner. Dave
bentstem

Quote:
Any idea what year of manufacture this might be?

It's commonly thought Synchrostem was introduced in 1929 and Kaywoodie started stamping pipes Imported Briar in 1936.  Your pipe has a Synchrostem fitting so it is 1929 or later.  It is stamped Aged Bruyere so it is 1936 or earlier.  That's how I would call it.

       kaywoodie.myfreeforum.org Forum Index -> Kaywoodie Talk
Page 1 of 1
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum